Mosaic Admissions

Early Decision/Action: Numbers Surging

It’s been a while since my last post, and several of you have prompted me to write more often (thanks for the nudge!).  I apologize for the delay, but it’s been a busy time for Mosaic Admissions as my senior clients complete their applications.  Many of my clients have applied to colleges either through an Early Action or Early Decision program, which will enable them to learn their fate from their top schools before the holiday break.  As some of you might know, Early Action/Early Decision programs continue to generate controversy.  Those who favor Early programs argue that it alleviates stress among high school seniors and their parents, since most colleges notify applicants in December.  Those who feel that Early programs are evil incarnate argue that applicants are actually more stressed, since they have to strategize which program optimizes their chance for admission (Early vs. Regular).  Another common argument against Early programs is that they’re socioeconomically biased and favor affluent applicants, since Early Decision programs don’t allow families to compare financial aid packages among colleges.  I don’t see the debate subsiding any time soon – particularly now that schools such as The University of Virginia recently announced that it’s reinstating its Early Application program, which it had eliminated three years ago (UVA now offers a nonbinding Early Action program, while its previous program was the restrictive Early Decision option).  Harvard, which eliminated its Early Action program several years ago, continues to “evaluate” its admission program, and hasn’t followed suit (why should it?  Every year Harvard receives a record number of applicants and lowers its yield). 

Interestingly, many colleges have released their preliminary Early Action/Early Decision numbers, which are noted in the link below.  The schools that experienced the most significant surges include Trinity University (Texas – +60%), Furman University (+58.77%), and Lafayette University (+56.32%).  Occidental College has the dubious distinction of experiencing the largest drop in Early applications (-17.95%). 

http://thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/18/ed/

Feel free to read the following articles about The University of Virginia’s decision and the college application frenzy in general:  

http://thechoice.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/23/virginia/

 

http://chronicle.com/article/Application-Inflation/125277/

Happy reading, and happy holidays to all! 


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